Black Caribbean men do more housework than other male ethnic groups, a new study has found.

The attitudes and behaviour of almost 30,000 couples were tracked by household study group, Understanding Society, led by academics.

Women across all ethnic groups spent significantly more hours on housework than men – with the average British man spending around six hours a week on chores compared to more than double that for women.

The study found that there are considerable differences across ethnic groups - with the survey not reflecting well on the willingness of white males to do their fair share DailyMail

The study found that there are considerable differences across ethnic groups – with the survey not reflecting well on the willingness of white males to do their fair share DailyMail

The study found that there are considerable differences across ethnic groups – with the survey not reflecting well on the willingness of white males to do their fair share.

‘We found both differences and similarities among ethnic groups, but were surprised to see that in multicultural Britain today, white British couples are not necessarily the most modern and egalitarian in their outlook on housework,’ Laurie added.

‘Previously we haven’t known anything about the distribution of housework across different ethnic groups. It’s really interesting to see how much difference there is. More so for women than men.’

She said the historical roots of black Caribbeans mean they have a more balanced family structure.

Prof Heather Laurie, from University of Essex, said there are 'fairly entrenched differences for white British couples' when it comes to doing housework Photo courtesy DailyMail

Prof Heather Laurie, from University of Essex, said there are ‘fairly entrenched differences for white British couples’ when it comes to doing housework Photo courtesy DailyMail

Indian men undertake almost seven hours of cleaning and cooking weekly – about a quarter of the overall load.

The study found that Pakistani men do less than a fifth of the 24 hours done by their partners.

These figures were produced by calculating averages taken across British ethnic groups.

Education and background of the couple was not considered in the report. Indian and Bangladeshi men who have been to university do more housework than those without.

And if a man’s partner was employed their share of the housework significantly increase. But if a man is in paid employment it decreased their housework hours by three hours a week.

Article courtesy: http://www.dailymail.co.uk